Future and who is backing thymeleaf?

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Future and who is backing thymeleaf?

retrofit_brain
Looking at thymeleaf for my next project and it looks very impressive. Had a couple of questions before i take the plunge. I am hoping someone can answer (Daniel?)

1) It looks like Daniel is the only one maintaining this? Am i right or we have a bigger steady community? It will be risky to use something which may not have active maintenance.

2) Any plans on integrating with Backbone.js (atleast samples) or providing a bridge for backbone to render thymeleaf?

3) Who is using thymeleaf?

Thanks for all the good work.
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Re: Future and who is backing thymeleaf?

Zemi
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> 1) It looks like Daniel is the only one maintaining this? Am i right or we have a bigger steady community?
> It will be risky to use something which may not have active maintenance.

Yes, Daniel is the leader of the project. Other people sometimes make contributions, but Daniel is in practice the only commiter.

I made myself the same question when I started to use one of the first betas of Thymeleaf. My points were:
- Thymeleaf already does everything I need.
- It has an Apache license.
So in case the project was discontinued, I could go on using it without problems, and if some bug rose, I could made a patch.

Thymeleaf is far from be discountinued, but it is being actively developed by now.

On the contrary, there are many libraries everyone uses everyday that are indeed abandoned. For example, last version of standard JSP taglibs are from 2004. I know because I reported a major bug that was fixed in 2005 but a bugfixing version has been never released.


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Re: Future and who is backing thymeleaf?

danielfernandez
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In reply to this post by retrofit_brain
Yours are very legitimate questions. I'll try to give you all the answers you need....


1) It looks like Daniel is the only one maintaining this? Am i right or we have a bigger steady community? It will be risky to use something which may not have active maintenance.


First let's differentiate between an "active developer" (a person who writes code, solves bugs, etc. at least a couple of hours every week in average) and a "contributor" (a person who simply contributes a patch or a series of patches, documentation, etc. once, maybe a couple of times).

I am the project founder and, as of today, the only "active developer" of thymeleaf. There is a community of users, some of them very strong supporters of the project (like for example Zemi), and there are a number of contributors as you can see at http://www.thymeleaf.org/team.html, but there is no such thing as a "community of developers" yet. Nevertheless, thymeleaf is a very young project (first stable version in July 2011) and it is open to contributions, so I think we can safely say the project will probably get some additional active developers during the next years.

I don't expect this "active developer community" to grow a lot anyway, as thymeleaf is a quite small project very focused on a specific aspect of web technologies: templating. This is not the Spring Framework, Apache Wicket or anything like that, and so a large team of more than, say, 4 or 5 developers working on such a small code base could get extremely difficult to manage.

As for "risky to use something which may not have active maintenance"... I would add "if it weren't open source software". Which Thymeleaf is. The great thing about Open Source is that if some day my wife decides to burn my computers and lock me up in a closet in the middle of the mountains with no phone coverage --something unlikely as she's a thymeleaf contributor too--, anyone (you, for example) could fork the code base and carry on from where I left it. At most, in such case we would go through a project name change --perhaps not even that.

As Zemi said, there are many, many projects out there without any active maintenance, even if widely used. JSTL is an example. SiteMesh is another one, etc. I tend to think that, if for whichever reason a popular project goes unmaintained and nobody in the community picks it up and continues where it stopped... it normally is because the time of that project is gone, and it is no more as important as to move other people to go on working on it.


2) Any plans on integrating with Backbone.js (atleast samples) or providing a bridge for backbone to render thymeleaf?


There are no current incompatibilities between thymeleaf and any javascript libraries, as they operate on different sides of the scenario (backbone, jquery, etc. at the client side, thymeleaf at the server side). What kind of integration are you thinking about here?


3) Who is using thymeleaf?


That I'd love to know! :-D

That's something extremely difficult to know for an open source project maintainer like me. With open source software, people come, get the software, use it... and in most cases they never come back to say "hey, we are using it at X and it's great, you can say this to anyone and use us as a reference!". As of today, I can say for example that is is being used at sahibinden.com (see http://www.slideshare.net/thymeleaf/spring-io-2012-natural-templating-in-spring-mvc-with-thymeleaf/46 ) and also that it is the template engine of choice at the Broadleaf Commerce framework ( http://www.broadleafcommerce.com ) since its version 2.0. But little more than that. Or better said, little more that I know I can make public ;-)


Regards,
Daniel.